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News and Reviews Index > Popular Computing weekly's - Win an Ace


  In the October 1982, Popular Computing weekly ran a competition to win a Jupiter Ace.

The lucky winners were, Jolyon Ralph and Jeremy Hill (if anyone knows where he is, please get in touch with Jolyon or me), their programme was called "Elements" and was a basic chemistry program.

"I put it together in Prolog (or rather a version of Prolog designed as an educational tool for kids called 'SIMPLE')

We were part of a pilot group given computer lessons one afternoon a week as part of a project run by Imperial College - strangely enough Jeremey wasn't part of the Pilot group, but he hung around enough times at lunch and after school to get himself involved.
"

"It was written on a Northstar Horizon CP/M machine which our school was given by Imperial College as part of this project - Later on we had *two* computers, we were given a Research Machines 380Z too.."

"The program was quite simple, it was a table of elements with data, and a set of functions that allowed you to query them using various rules - unfortunately I don't have a copy of this any more. "
(If it turns up we I would love to list it here!)

"I seem to recall that they only printed Jeremy's name in the magazine as the "winner" - which was not surprising as he was the one who did the documentation and filled in the entry form!" - Jolyon Ralph



Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 1
Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 2
Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 1
Popular Computing Weekly, 7th October 1982.

Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 2
Popular Computing Weekly, 14th October 1982.

Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 4

Popular Computing Weekly 21st October 1982.
Popular Computing weekly competition to win a Jupiter Ace Week 4
Popular Computing Weekly, 28th October 1982.





Competition
winner

JEREMY Hill of Wimbledon has won a Jupiter Ace in our Better than Basic competition. His winning entry, written in Prolog, was a program to determine the name, atomic weight, number and symbol of various elements. Co-judge Steve Vickers commented that the program "demonstrated how a non-Basic program could do some jobs much faster than an equivalent Basic program".
Other competition entries worthy of mention include M Graven's dictionary program, written in Forth, and Bentley Thomas's Towers of Hanoi program, written in micro-Forth.

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